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       Is your brand messaging in need of an update?   Your brand messaging is directly linked to lead generation. Wondering how? Your messaging helps prospective buyers figure out if your product and company is the right choice for them. This is why most businesses spend considerable time pinpointing the exact messages they will convey.   Once the messaging is set, a business can move on to other issues, right? Wrong. There are situations—perhaps more than you’d expect—when your brand message deserves an update. Let’s dig in.   What is brand messaging?   Brand messaging refers to a set of phrases that communicate what you’re offering. In a quick scan, they articulate product/service category, points of difference and key benefits. In a nutshell, this messaging helps buyers understand why they should choose to buy from you rather than your competitors.   Taglines or slogans are one of the most obvious aspects of brand messaging. When you hear the phrase, “Just do it.”, you think of Nike. Taken a step further, you might think about dedication, ambition, and competitive spirit. These associations are intentional. Similarly, 3M’s slogan is “Science. Applied to life.” and their personality traits are  reportedly : free thinking and creative; sharing and trusting; fascinating; high-energy, optimistic and confident.     According to recent research  , messaging that’s focused on features, functions and business outcomes results in a 21% increase in perceived brand benefits, on average. Compare this to messaging focused on social and emotional benefits, which boosts results by 42%.   It may surprise you to hear that new messaging can be developed pretty quickly. At Hop Skip Marketing, we get all of the key stakeholders together in front of a whiteboard and develop it as a group in a few hours. The beauty of this type of approach is that you have buy-in, and the leaders of all the impacted functions appreciate how the messaging was developed.   Do’s and Don’ts of developing your brand messaging   DO: Convey what you offer and which category you are in.  DO: Articulate what makes it different (better) from the other options buyers will be considering.  DO: Compare your draft messaging to that of your competitive set to ensure you aren’t saying the exact same things they are. (Remember, you are trying to help buyers understand why they should choose to buy from you.)  DO: Quantify your messages to make them more believable. For example, citing “deep experience” is not as compelling as “25 years’ experience and 22,000 customers served”.  DO: Test messaging with a sample audience before launching.  DON’T: Promise things about your product that aren’t true today. Misleading promises can quickly tarnish a good reputation.  DON’T: Hang your hat on things that your buyers don’t value.  DON’T: Launch your messaging without first introducing it internally and explaining why you have settled on this particular set of messages.   Rolling out brand messaging   Brand messaging goes well beyond your website. It should be used frequently and consistently inside and outside of your organization. And it should be known by everyone at the company from your CEO to your front desk employees. Seem like overkill? Not at all. We just finished rolling out brand messaging for a client. During the workshop to develop their messaging, the management team agreed that their overall customer service and production process are par-none. We explored all the ways this is true throughout their process, including a 10-step quality program. In the end, we landed on the tagline “Exception. Every step of the way.” with sub messaging such as having a 10-step quality program for product excellence. Before taking this messaging public, we first rolled out with the sales and production teams, then to the entire company in an all-company townhall. Not only did we explain all of the messaging and how each department would ensure it is living up to these public promises, we also showed them how it would position us ahead of the competitors who had nothing like this. Just last week, the production team started moving a 10-step checklist along with each unit to ensure the team signs off on each step as it is completed.  Once internalized, it’s time to take your messaging public. Plan to update as much (if not all of) your public-facing collateral as you can at launch time. If this isn’t feasible, create a rollout plan.   Reinforcing your messaging with imagery and colour   Visual elements like images, colours and fonts are often used to reinforce brand messaging. For instance, many companies whose Canadian ownership is a key differentiator include “100% Canadian” or “Canadian owned and operated” into their messaging. This is often reinforced by Canadian imagery or symbols, and a brand colour palette that includes red. This is the approach we took with one of our clients who is in a category alongside many US-owned companies.  Messaging should be reinforced through experiential aspects too, like customer service, hiring, and corporate policies. For example, if a company hangs its hat on being the category leader for innovation, a slick up-to-date website designs with best-in-class user experience would make their messaging much more believable. Or, if a company says they treat customers like gold, all departments should have set ways that make that happen, like responding to inquiries within 15 minutes, or sending a gift if the service is in some way sub-par (ever received a free Starbucks drink because they messed up the order or took too long?).   Does your brand message need a review?   Once rolled out, a brand message can seem immovable—and indeed, a great message will resonate over time. But there are several events in the lifetime of a brand that should trigger a message review.   Introducing a new innovation   When there are new innovations in your sector you should schedule a messaging review to ensure that you remain relevant and at the forefront.   When you do a rebrand or refresh   Brand elements like design and logos should be refreshed periodically. If you are shifting to demonstrate new personality traits or to resonate with a different buyer group, your messaging may need tweaking.   During a new product launch   When introducing a new product, you will need to develop messaging for the product line and buyer. This work should include an audit of the competitors’ product messaging.   Entering a new market or when there’s a shift in the market   Reviewing your overall messaging when entering a new market is crucial. Perhaps less obviously, it’s a great time for review if there has been a change in competitor activity, an economic shift, or a change in consumer buying behaviour in your existing market. If you are in an industry that’s growing, you’ll have to revisit messaging and position frequently.   When developing your annual marketing plan   Times change, which is why each year you need to engage in strategic marketing work. Consider a messaging and brand review (your messaging and that of your top competitors) as part of that work.   Your brand messaging checklist   There are numerous opportunities throughout the year to check your messaging, but what should you be looking for? Here are the three important questions to ask:   1. Does your core messaging offer anything different from your competitors?   Be honest! If your messaging has become repetitive or indistinct, it’s time to reach for something new to differentiate yourself.   2. Do your messages reflect reality?  Your brand messaging might be excruciatingly clever, but if it doesn’t reflect reality it won’t land the way you want it to. Make sure your communications are grounded.   3. Do your messages still resonate with your target audience?   Changes in products or price point, new competitors, or shifts in customer behaviour can all affect your business landscape. Review your target audience, and make sure your messages still resonate. A customer survey is a great way to do this.  Your company works hard to create relevant, resonant brand messaging. Don’t let the effort go to waste. Keep an eye on industry trends and take advantage of the natural opportunities for review that arise throughout the year. Regular brand messaging checkups can help you grow and prosper.

Is your brand messaging in need of an update?

Your company works hard to create relevant, resonant brand messaging. Regular brand messaging checkups can help you grow and prosper. Whether it’s new innovation, shift in industry trends, or creating your annual marketing plan a review of your brand messaging should be on your checklist. Let’s dig in further….

      How a 30-year-old manufacturer solved its market share problem  Every company wants more market share. What many struggle with is how to get it. In the face of fierce competition and other internal and external challenges, figuring out how to grow market share can feel daunting. It’s a beast of a question. What helps—a lot—is having an experienced marketing team at the table. We say this from experience.   There is no one way to gain market share. It is commonly done by innovating, improving customer experience, strengthening brand, and making acquisitions. Today we’ll shed light on how we helped a manufacturer increase its market share and enter two completely new markets resulting in bottom line growth, as well as the growth of its sales and customer service teams.  Updating a tired brand can create a high ROI   When we first started working with this B2B manufacturer, their top priority was reducing risk by diversifying their client base. They aimed to go from a few very large accounts to multiple small and mid-sized accounts. They were in a position to service new clients well, and their product was solid. The main issue was attracting leads and getting them to a point where they were ready to speak with sales.       
   
     “ 50% of leads are qualified but not yet ready to buy. ” 
   
   — Gleanster Research 
 
     Our marketing team had one big goal: to resonate with and convert new buyers. We also had one big problem: the main reasons to buy from this company were their innovative solutions and top-quality service, but these were not reflected in their dated brand and vanilla website copy. It’s hard to claim you are innovative and committed to quality when you look like a relic from bygone era. And potential buyers look for a certain amount of product information before they are willing to speak with sales. The company needed a virtual rebirth to achieve their goals.  Over six months, we completed a comprehensive rebrand, including a new logo, tagline, photography, messaging and website. We carefully crafted the website to provide detailed product information potential buyers were looking for, and communicate the company’s strengths so that buyers were able to understand the benefits of working with this manufacturer over the others. We also produced a video and created basic sales collateral, to further help educate buyers and assist the sales process.  The change was drastic. And the industry and buyers took notice. Their website traffic grew from 1300 website visitors in 2013/14 to 14,400 visitors over the same 12-month period in 2015/16.  By fall 2017, two years into working with us, the company had to increase the sales team’s headcount to respond to the requests for quotes and manage the additional jobs. The customer service team also expanded. The company, which had long prospered thanks to a few large clients had now acquired dozens of small- and mid-sized accounts within the same industry. We were growing market share!  Bottom line growth by entering a new market   With our first big goal achieved, it was time to set new marketing and sales goals. We agreed to expand into the craft beer and distilling industries, which were booming and a great match with their fortes.   The launch involved two large initiatives: tradeshows and direct mail. We also wrote monthly articles, daily social media posts and ran Google Ads. These all fit neatly into a trademarked umbrella campaign we called Own the Shelf. (Search the #owntheshelf hashtag to see the social media rollout!)  This campaign further increased the website traffic and earned the company some headlines, too. As for bottom line growth, the direct mail campaign was a major contributor. The mailer was sent to decision makers of 70 Canadian distillers. A whopping 68% of them engaged in the campaign, and 7% converted into net new customers.  Our multi-faceted multi-year marketing work yielded excellent results for this B2B company. The website doesn’t just look and sound (way) better—it has become a lead-to-conversion machine. Today, a whopping 40% of web leads convert to clients. And we’re continuing to bring in new clients, in old markets and new.  Don’t shy away from a goal of increasing market share. It is complicated and won’t happen overnight, but equipped with a strategy, tactical plan and experienced marketing team, it is definitely do-able.

How a 30-year-old manufacturer solved its market share problem

One of the most talked about challenges today in business is gaining market share. We shed some light on how we helped a manufacturer increase its existing market share and enter two completely new markets— resulting in bottom line growth, as well as the growth of their sales and customer service teams.

      Hop Skip Marketing named leading agency on Clutch.co  Clutch.co, an on-line data driven field guide for B2B buying and hiring decisions, recently named Hop Skip Marketing one of the leading  digital marketing agencies in Canada . It’s always great to have our work recognized, but this is an extra-special acknowledgment. Clutch arrives at its rankings through in-depth research of a company’s website, portfolio, case studies, and awards—and most importantly, it conducts client interviews. This means our clients’ feedback is directly responsible for our success on the Clutch list.  So just how did we manage our success on Clutch? There was a clue—even for us—when we looked over our clients’ responses. Consider this feedback from the president of Backbone Technology: “They provide good results, and we have a good working relationship. They understand our business well, which can’t be said of all marketing firms. They’re responsible and professional, accomplishing all of the work given to them. They keep us up to standard and ensure our software and tools are working properly.”  Though we’re listed under “digital marketing agencies,” at Hop Skip we consider ourselves to be a marketing consultant agency. The most pronounced difference is that we act as your company’s marketing department. That means we're in your office weekly to look after your entire marketing strategy and implementation, just like an in-house marketing department would. It's a model that offers companies like Backbone Technology the best of both worlds: the scalability of outsourced marketing, with the deeper relationship and familiarity of in-house staff.  Of course, it’s all just semantics unless you can prove results. Look at what the sales manager at iCapital had to say to Clutch: “Hop Skip's efforts have almost doubled our sales each year and set a record last year. The website they built has become one of our greatest tools; we receive lots of applications through the site and clients are actively enjoying its features.”  You can see these and all our reviews, as well as our 5-star ratings on  our Clutch profile . And while you’re at it, surf over to Clutch sister site The Manifest, where we’re listed as one of their  top digital marketing agencies in the world .  These accolades are awesome, but more importantly, they set us up for success in our growth goal. Next up, we’re looking to be the go-to marketing solution for B2B companies in Toronto, GTA West, and the Halton/Hamilton region.   

Hop Skip Marketing named leading agency on Clutch.co

Clutch.co recently named Hop Skip Marketing one of the leading digital marketing agencies in Canada. It’s always nice to have our work recognized, but this is an extra-special acknowledgment.

      Why You Should Refresh Your Marketing Annually  For better or worse, the business world changes constantly. Your company goals shift from year to year. And your marketing strategy should change along with them. The same plan of attack just won’t work year-over-year, because every year you’re marketing a different version of your company to a different version of the marketplace.  In fact, since a good marketing strategy is specific, this is  even more true  if last year’s marketing was excellent. The specificity that gave it power won’t apply anymore. You’ll have new growth goals to attain. And maybe a new product, or initiative to launch, too.  So, what do you need to remember when you’re refocusing your marketing?   Keep track of the state of marketing today, both in form and function    In the past, the methods of B2B marketing were completely different, because people chose their suppliers differently. Consumers gathered information primarily from brochures and trade shows. Their sales relationships started earlier, and they were more loyal to the brands they selected.  Potential buyers don’t speak with sales until they’ve done their online research. So you have to provide the lots of information up front. This has made more intentional, active marketing a necessity. Gone are the days when marketing was a cost centre; today it’s a revenue centre.  Customer relationships are affected by marketing, too. Customers are more fickle when it comes to brand loyalty.  Simultaneously, there are changes in what buyers expect aesthetically and function-wise on your website. Perhaps we need to count the life of a website in dog years! If your site is more than 5 years old, it isn’t impressing anyone. If you are claiming to be innovative and your site is old ... well, as Donny Brasco says fuhgeddaboudit.     These changes don’t happen instantly—they’re composed of micro-trends that come and go. Faster than you can say fugazi, buyer expectations, new competitor tactics, and linguistic tics sweep the market and then disappear. Keeping abreast of these developments can be the difference between your brand dominating, and your brand falling to the back of the pack.   Responding to environmental shifts and positioning against competitors   Different market conditions can call for completely different approaches to selling the same product.  Let’s say you’re selling video conferencing equipment, and you’re advertising at a time when the economy is booming. Given the economic abundance, it might be the time to sell your equipment as a prestige good. Focus on the lustrous quality of your images, your comprehensive feature set, and so on.  But then, the market takes a downturn. Even prosperous companies are tightening their budgets. What do you do then? Focus on the budgetary advantages of your product. Talk about how it facilitates more efficient meetings, which will save companies money. Share statistics about its reliability, making it clear that you’re offering a sound investment.  And this is just one example of the kinds of change that you need to navigate. New innovations, political shifts, and regulatory changes can all be a big deal. For example, in our past work with Canada Cartage part of our marketing strategy and plan focused on attracting and retaining drivers because of the shortage of truck drivers in Canada.  Accounting software company Auvenir, which we built a strategy for in 2017, needed to covey its know-how in machine learning and AI in order to prove it is the most innovative, progressive brand in its saturated category.  This brings us to the fact that you’ll have to plan around competitors, too. Obviously, you’re better at some things than they are, but your customers don’t know that—unless you communicate these differences. Every single company we’ve worked with has needed to better articulate how it stands apart from the competition.  This involves studying your competitors—knowing about their brand, messaging,  marketing tactics, and more, so that you can actively differentiate from them, and achieve your goals.   Alignment and goal setting are crucial to ensuring your marketing pays off    But hey, what are those goals again? Surprisingly, some companies ignore this question. The reality is most companies we work with don’t have the expertise or bandwidth to develop a marketing strategy and plan. So any marketing they are doing is off the cuff.  Marketing should always align with goals, priorities and what departments like sales and customer service are doing. Marketing is a function that supports most functions in the business: product innovation, regulatory compliance, sales, customer service. Even the front desk staff.  At Hop Skip Marketing, we insist on refreshing the marketing strategy, tactics and budget annually. And every year we update the key performance indicators (KPIs) for marketing too. These goals are SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound. For more on this,  read this blog we wrote  about how to set relevant and SMART goals every time.   The Upshot   It might seem like a chore to revisit your marketing plans on an annual basis. But it’s the only way to avoid wasting money and falling behind competitors.  Refreshing your marketing every year is how you maintain your brand’s relevance and success in a fast-changing world. Ultimately, it’s the way into your customers’ hearts—and, of course, their wallets.

Why You Should Refresh Your Marketing Annually

For better or worse, the business world changes constantly. Your company goals shift from year to year. And your marketing strategy should change along with them. The same plan of attack just won’t work year-over-year, because every year you’re marketing a different version of your company to a different version of the marketplace.

      Ready or not, GDPR has come; here’s what Canadian B2B business owners need to know  As a Canadian business owner who depends on B2B interactions, you probably remember the commotion surrounding  Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL)  coming into effect in 2014. Those four letters had many B2B businesses in a frenzy as they tried to understand the rules and update their communication consent practices.  Just when you thought you were in the clear, you have four new letters to worry about. You’ve likely heard received several emails from other companies about GDPR compliance in the last month or so. But do you have you considered the impact it could have on your business? Are you in compliance?  The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) represents a huge shift in the way businesses are required to handle customers’ data. It came into effect May 25, 2018. And, unfortunately, doing nothing is not an option. If your business isn’t compliant with the new regulations, you could face serious consequences, such as a fine of up to $20 million Euros or four per cent of your annual global turnover.   How does GDPR compare with CASL?   This European legislation was designed to harmonize data protection laws across the European Union (EU). It wasn’t intentionally designed to make a business owner’s job more difficult. Instead, it was created to enhance consumers’ rights regarding their personal data. Here’s how it compares to CASL:     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


        How do I ensure my business is obtaining proper consent?   Under GDPR, it’s not enough to just claim that individuals have given you their permission to be contacted and/or collect their information. Instead, you must prove it. This involves keeping a detailed record of the following:    Who consented? What is their full name, company name and job title?    When they provided consent? Record the day and time.    What information was provided by your company? This should include a copy of your data-collection form, as well as your privacy policy.    How did they provide consent? Be sure to retain a date- and time-stamped copy of your data-collection form.    In addition, should a person request that their personal information be deleted from your database, it’s imperative that you keep a record of this request along with its completion date.   How do I create a compliant opt-in process?   Under GDPR, you need to present information clearly to individuals when inviting them to opt in and give you their consent to be contacted or have their data collected. Here are a few tips to remember when writing copy for your opt-in web pages and documents.    Use simple language.    Avoid technical words or jargon.    Write concise statements without ambiguity.    Under these new regulations, people will no longer be overwhelmed with unwanted communications materials. Instead, they’ll receive only the content they opted in to receive. This puts greater control in the hands of consumers, and confirms that every interaction with your business is a desired one.  For more information on GDPR, and to view the legislation in full, visit the  EU GDPR Information Portal

Ready or not, GDPR has come; here’s what Canadian B2B business owners need to know

Just when you thought you were in the clear, you have four new letters to worry about. You’ve likely heard received several emails from other companies about GDPR compliance in the last month or so. But do you have you considered the impact it could have on your business?

      Is your website's performance holding you back?  Enhancing the performance of your website can have a direct impact on your traffic, leads and revenue. If your site isn’t “performing” well, it's probably negatively impacting user experience, customer adoption, brand perception, search engine ranking and lead conversion.  Many organizations (even experienced marketers) ignore performance because it feels too technical. This is a costly mistake. If your site takes more than three seconds to load, for example, you’ll lose 40% of your visitors, says  KISSmetrics .  To help you out, we've put together this simple, short SEO cheat sheet to help you gain a better understanding of what makes a site perform well. Read through them, then run your website through our favourite SEO analysis tools to see your your site rates and what, if anything, needs to be fixed.   Demystifying common SEO terms   SEO whaaat? Fear not! Here are some of the most common terms you should know, explained in plain English:   Page requests  You page will slow down with every HTTP request your website makes. You can combine files to reduce the number of requests. This will optimize your page load time, and ultimately improve your user experience, bounce rate and more.   Page speed  The best websites load within three seconds. Slow loading times can lead to reduced visitors, sales and revenue. The biggest factor that contributes to speed is your page size. Again, aim to keep all page files less than 3 MB.   Browser caching  This speeds up your website by storing repeatedly used content in local memory. Enabling browser caching allows you to temporarily store data on a user’s device so they don’t have to wait for it to reload every time they visit.   Page redirects  In simplest terms, a 301 redirect can be compared to the mail forwarding service offered by your local post office. Unfortunately, online, these add an additional loading cycle to your website, and increase the time it takes to display your page.   Compression  If your images, JavaScript and CSS are properly compressed, your website will run much quicker. Here, there’s no magic number, all page elements considered, just aim to keep your page sizes as low as possible.   Render blocking  This means removing or deferring JavaScript and CSS that interfere with loading your above-the-fold content.   How to tell how well your site is performing   You might think you have great SEO, but the only way to know for sure is to use site analysis tools. We think these three are some of the best free website analysis tools out there:   Google Sandbox and Penalty Checker  i.e. are you in the dog house with Google? This tool gives more of a sniff test than anything. If you get a "possible penalty" you'll know to dig deeper.  > Try the Sandbox tool    Moz's Open Site Explorer  Your site's "domain authority" is an important factor in how well you rank for particular keywords. This tracks your site's link profile. You'll see that each site that links in to you have a domain authority and spam score.    Google Search Console Search Analysis  Analyze your performance on Google Search by seeing what people are typing into Google and what is making people click through to your site. You can event filter and compare your results to better understand your user's search patterns.      This blog is a DIY starter kit for improving your SEO. Between understanding the most common SEO terminology and using tools to diagnose where your site is strong and where it's weak, you'll get clarity on what you need to focus on for the next several months. Start by fixing glaring problems (i.e. if you've been "sandboxed" or if your site speed is slow), then dig in to generate incremental improvements that will pull up your ranking. SEO is a marathon, not a sprint, so take it one step at a time and you'll get there!

Is your website's performance holding you back?

This blog is a DIY starter kit for improving your SEO. We demystify the most common SEO terminology and give you our favourite free tools so you can see where your site is strong, and where it's weak.

      The truth about mobile-friendly websites in B2B  In our work with mature small B2Bs we sometimes find ourselves debunking myths about the role of mobile in lead generation. We also hear horror stories about attempts to build mobile-friendly sites that went terribly wrong. If you are a B2B, here are some important truths and nuances about mobile.   Myth: lead generation doesn't happen on mobile   Forget investing in a comprehensive mobile strategy, some B2Bs strongly believe having even a mobile-friendly website isn't important for their business.   Could they be right?   The answer is best found in their website data. For our clients, visitors viewing the website on a mobile device ranges between 10% and 40% of their total traffic. Across the board, this traffic source has consistently grown over the past few years, and we can confidently predict traffic from mobile will continue to grow as a percentage of overall traffic. But even considering the low end, 10% of visitors is too large a number to ignore when you calculate how much goes into attracting these visitors in the first place.  Some people have expressed to us that people coming to their site through mobile aren't "real" buyers. But the stats say otherwise: not only are people doing their work at all times of day and night, they are also using their phone to conduct their buying research.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     In 2015, Google reported that 49% of B2B buyers who are using their mobile devices to do product research are actually doing so while at work. What's more, if you increase your marketing activity, this number is likely to lift.   One of our clients has gone from 10% of traffic coming in via mobile in 2012 to 42% in 2016 as a result of publishing more content, being more active social media and running more digital ads. And, of course, we have to account for the change in buyer behaviour that everyone is seeing as being a factor too.  At Hop Skip, we build mobile-friendly sites for all of our clients, no matter how big or small they are. If you are not well versed in website development, you may not know the difference between a mobile website and a responsive website. This nuance was the downfall of a B2B owner we spoken with a few weeks ago. He hired a web designer to create a mobile site as part of his website refresh, when what he wanted was a responsive site.    What is the difference between a responsive website and a mobile website?    A responsive site  is a website that's coded to  adapt  to the viewer's screen size (desktop, tablet, and mobiles of all sizes). Most, if not all, of the site content and functionality are available to the mobile visitor.   A mobile website  is a distinct copy of your website that is slimmed down for mobile users. When someone looks at your site using a mobile device, the server will show them the mobile website rather than the desktop version.  Mobile sites are becoming a thing of the past because responsive sites are more user friendly for visitors and administrators. Also, having a responsive site increases the likelihood that your site will be included in search results when someone is Googling on their mobile device because search engines are rewarding companies that have responsive sites.    Responsive sites are a must-have for selling in B2B. If your current site isn’t responsive, it’s time to change that so that you don’t miss out on leads or opportunities to engage customers and re-engage past customers. When working with a website designer, be clear about what you want, and make sure your designer is following  the latest mobile-friendly site recommendations  released by Google.  

The truth about mobile-friendly websites in B2B

The facts don't lie: B2Bs need to pay attention to their mobile traffic. Here are some of the latest stats and terminology you need to know.

      2 website security basics every B2B should know  Website security breeches are on the rise in Canada. Thirty-three of 125 Canadian companies who took a recent Malwarebytes survey had paid ransoms ranging between $1,000 and $50,000 to have the cyber attackers release their data; 11 of them temporarily closed down to cope with the breech.  Regardless of whether you store data such as customer contact info and credit card information, you should be doing everything in your power to secure your site because downtime while you try take back control of your site, and fix the mess the hacker may have made, is costly.  Here are two easy ways you can enhance security of your website:  Get an "SSL" certificate for your website’s URL  A cheap and easy way to add a level of security is to buy a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate for your website domain. An SSL helps protect your website from attacks, and lets your visitors know your content is reliable and secure. Here's how it works: when you add an SSL to your website, a user’s connection to it will be encrypted, which prevents hackers from intercepting any data.  It's possible you already have an SSL; here's how to tell: rather than your website address beginning with http:// it will begin with https:// and you will see a padlock icon in the URL bar.   And some good news: an SSL is easy and cheap to set up. Contact the company you buy your domain (URL) from and they'll have pricing and setup instructions. To give you an idea of the price to expect, Go Daddy currently offers an SSL for under $100 per year.    Choose your CMS carefully  Security is a huge pro for building your site on a closed-source platform such as Squarespace or Shopify. These platforms have professionals responsible for keeping the system safe. Plus, they are liable if a security breech happens. If you build on open source platform like WordPress then security is your responsibility to setup and maintain.   You likely already have a site, so if it is built on open source, you'll want to ensure you are protected by working with a professional who understands security. They will likely keep a close eye on your login page, PHP code, temporary files, plug-ins and old web applications (all the places hackers usually find their way in).     This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to web security, but get an SSL and do your best to secure your CMS, and you'll be well ahead of many other B2B companies. Once you have taken care of these two steps you'll be ready for more advanced security measures.

2 website security basics every B2B should know

Two ways you can enhance the security on your website. And some compelling reasons to do so.

      4 website best practices that boost organic search traffic  If your website is easy to discover, and easy for search engines to index, you’ll get better traffic than a competitor whose site is not. This type of web traffic is called "organic" because people are finding you naturally by typing their keywords into Google (or Bing or Explorer) and responding to the search results that pop up.  If you want to  rank first on Google  and make it easier for potential buyers to find your website, make sure you are following all four of these simple best practices:   1 \ Write strong page titles  Page titles should be no longer than 50 - 60 characters, without repeating keywords. Be descriptive and intentional with the words you use. This is what people will see in their Google results and will make or break whether they come to your site. Page titles also impact your search ranking.   2 \ Craft smart meta descriptions  This is the line of information that displays beneath the link in a search result. It describes the contents of your page, should be no longer than 155 characters and should be topical. A well-written meta description might earn you a better click-through rate (CTR), which in time  might  translate into an increase in your search rank.      

  

    

       

         

           
               
             

             
             

           

         

        
         
           

            

            
                This screen capture illustrates how page titles and meta descriptions are displayed on a search engine. The blue text is the page title, the black test is the meta description.    
            

            

           
         
        

       

    

  


    

  

    

       

         

           
               
             

             
             

           

         

        
         
           

            

            
                By contrast, here is a company that has entered the page title, but no meta data. In place of he meta description is "No information ... "    
            

            

           
         
        

       

    

  


      3 \ Be intentional with your headlines   Headlines (versus paragraph copy) distinguishes headings from page content. This helps search engines to know what your webpage is about (and thereby serve it to people when they are searching for that material). Headlines also help visitors to scan and find the information they're looking for.   Your website will have a few headline styles. H1 (headline one) will be the largest and most bold, whereas an H3 or H4 will be smaller. Use your H1s and H2s to explain what's on the page. Be sure they include keywords. Use H3s and H4s to introduce sub-sections, and make them descriptive rather than one or two words in order to help your page to rank.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      4 \ Publish frequent blog content  Finally, tick a few SEO boxes with the other content on your site. Having a blog is important for SEO (Google sees companies with lots of fresh quality content as more relevant than a stale 4-page site. Plus, it builds credibility with potential customers.   How often should you blog? Weekly would be great, but most of our clients tend toward monthly. Even quarterly is better than nothing. The more blogging you do, the more traffic you get. You'd be surprised how dramatically a blog can impact the number of people visiting (and revisiting) a website. One of our clients saw the number of visitors coming to their site skyrocket to 300% over the same 6-month period in the previous year. This was the result of publishing several articles and a white paper, and sharing them via email and social media.      Though these four best practices are simple, many organizations aren't employing them. If you and your competitors are among this group of laggards, it won't be hard for you to pull ahead. Start with the simple stuff: spend a couple hours in the back-end of your website and fix your page titles and meta descriptions. Next edit your headlines. Finally, address your blog content. Don't have one? There's no time like the present!

4 website best practices that boost organic search traffic

If you aspire to ranking first on Google, and want to make it easier for buyers to find your website, are are four simple best practices you'll want to follow.