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marketing

      Lead generation ideas for B2B tradeshows  You may not know this, but marketers are one of the toughest buyer groups to reach. So when vendors spend thousands to have a booth at a marketing conference, they’ve got to bring their A-game.   Looking for an idea to get show attendees to your booth? We’ve got your back: here are exceptional booth experiences we saw recently at a big North American marketing conference. And best of all, these ideas are simple and inexpensive to repeat, yet they increase traffic, create buzz and result in qualified leads.   Candy store  Everyone loves giveaways especially when they speak to your sweet tooth. This clever vendor included a postcard with an empty treat bag inviting attendees to visit “Candy Lane”. At the booth you could peruse the colourful candy buffet while chatting with the vendor.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Mystery key  Sometimes it’s not the location of the booth that drives traffic but the a clever pull strategy that attracts them, like a mystery key in the attendee bag that literally makes you go out of your way to find out what the key is for. Here’s how it worked: in our  conference bag we found a key with a note attached. The note directed us to a tiny, simple booth at the back of the hall where we inserted our key in hopes that it would open the box. If it did, we could take one of the juicy prizes inside, like an apple watch or tablet.   Of all the small booths, this one definitely saw more traffic because this activity piqued people’s curiosity. Our keys didn’t work, but Liz was there when an attendee’s key opened the box. She literally jumped up and down screaming. How’s that for drawing attention to your booth?! Plus, the vendor rang the bell so everyone in the hall knew there was a winner, then they took pics with her and posted them to the conference app and their social media. Well played, right?!     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Hashtag photos  Everyone who posted a photo on social and used the conference hashtag had a shared destination: Lustre’s booth. The Lustre sales people printed off the photo  (with their branding and the conference name at the bottom) and attendees could take their photos home. Months later, Liz still has her pic in her wallet. #NailedIt     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Interactive pixel board  Interactive elements capture people’s attention as they move through the hall. This live pixel board was a great conversation starter. The pixels move with you as you move in front of the tiny camera. Check out this outline of Liz. It isn’t the  best   rendering of her, but it caught her attention and was a conversation-starter.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     The Ball Pit  We’ve saved our favourite for last. Those of us with kids are all too familiar with ball pits. But when it’s just for adults, it’s a lot more fun. Here’s how this one worked: attendees got a ball in their conference bag, which piqued their curiosity (what could it be for?). When they entered the vendor hall the ball dropped (sorry, we couldn’t help ourselves). Front and centre was a ball pit in the brand colours, orange and white. Attendees wrote their name and company name on the ball and threw it into the pit for a draw at 6pm that day. Those who wanted more entries could answer a short survey or take a photo of themselves inside the ball pit and share it on social. At draw time a huge crowd formed around the booth.  The biggest influencer at the conference dove into the pit to select the first winning ball. Then, the vendor drew several names and those people took home prizes like a Nintendo gaming system, Apple watch and other tech devices. This booth drew the largest crowd in the vendor hall and was undeniably the most fun. They also built a solid list through their survey.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Many companies question the value of attending tradeshows. But like any tactic, you don’t know if it will work until you try it. Shows are a good place to connect with clients and past clients, too. Setup one-on-ones or offer them a VIP gift for popping by the booth. Even a simple email to your list telling them you’ll be at X conference keeps you top of mind. Plus, there are follow-up opportunities to your broad list such as a show synopsis or a value-add blog like “3 takeaways from XXX show”.  Whatever you do, go with a well-thought-through plan to generate easy conversations with attendees, capture leads, qualify them, and follow-up.

Lead generation ideas for B2B tradeshows

When vendors spend thousands to have a booth at a marketing conference, they’ve got to bring their A-game. Here are the booths experiences we loved the most right now.

      The ins & outs of brand architecture  At its simplest, brand architecture is the way that a company presents its products/services. Selecting the best architecture for your company's offering is a strategic move. So understanding your options and the strategic reasons for choosing one over another is an important part of your overall marketing strategy—and, it’s not just for big business. We've helped several clients figure out their brand architecture. For the most part, this question has arisen when we were launching a new product/service. Here are the basics we have shared with our clients as we worked through their brand architecture.  Brand architecture and how it affects your business  Brand architecture is the strategy behind and implementation of a structure for a company’s products and services, brands and sub-brands. It creates the structure of your offerings, which can affect practical concerns like whether a service or product can be sold without changing the name, and the story, which will be a key part of how you communicate to your customers and potential customers. More on this to follow, but first, let’s look at why brand architecture is so important:    Builds general awareness and clarity of your offerings    Allows you to segment messaging    Anticipates and prepares for strategic growth    Anticipates eventual sale/acquisition of that service/product    Can reduce (or increase) marketing costs    Let’s look at the three major ways brands are structured.    Masterbrand, endorsed, or freestanding: Which works best for you?  There are three common ways companies build their brand architecture, each with their own pros and cons.  Masterbrand  Also referred to as "corporate" or "branded house", this structure can be understood as one main brand that contains many sub-brands or products. For example, Volvo's truck offering organizes each model with Brand + series number. Compare this to how it brands its consumer car lines like VW, Jetta, Tiguan and Passat.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     GE is another great example of this architecture.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     With this masterbrand approach, each product/service is inextricably linked to the main company (in brand-speak the "parent" brand). This is a good structure for those who want to build on the cache of the parent brand, existing customer relationships and loyalty. We find this approach works well for SMBs in B2B because it is much more cost effective than needing to develop unique brands (and collateral, websites, etc.) for each product/service. Also, because budgets are small we can achieve better results with this architecture.  Endorsed  This model associates a sub-brand or product with the main brand without completely linking them. Quite literally, the product appears to be "endorsed" by the main brand, which gives it some credibility and name recognition, but it maintains its own profile. PlayStation by Sony or Speed Stick by Mennen are two consumer product examples. Leveraging the reputation of the main brand is valuable, but it can give the product a lot to live up to.  Freestanding  In this brand structure products/services don't have any discernible connection to the parent company—they stand on their own (have their own website, marketing strategy, budget and tactics, etc.). Obviously this architecture foregoes leveraging the power of the main brand, but on the plus side it is extremely flexible, allowing, for example, for a product to be sold without having to change much of the customer-facing messaging. This approach costs a lot more, but it works great when you have a few products in the same category, or if you have many products and each targets a wholly different audience. Proctor & Gamble is a perfect example. They're one of the largest corporations in the world, but their products stand on their own. You wouldn’t know they own Crest, or Always, or Mr. Clean by looking at the packaging or marketing of those products. A local SMB example is Barrie-based  product design company Humanscope . They are the whole owner of  Menopod , which is a freestanding brand with its own website, sales and marketing strategy. This architecture poises the products for acquisition, and also fits well because of the drastically different markets their products target, and how these products are sold.  As you can see, your brand architecture clarifies how much or little you want to leverage your parent company’s name and reputation.  What brand architecture is best for your company?  Understanding how brand architecture works is one thing, but strategizing and implementing is another. Most SMBs don't have the in-house expertise to determine this, so they bring in a marketer with experience in brand architecture. They analyze the offering through questions about your existing brand architecture, target market, price points and business objectives. By understanding what you have, they can determine where you might need to make changes. They'll show you the architecture by sketching it out like an org chart.  When your brand architecture is complete, you can begin to implement the elements of your brand—taglines, logos, colours, and so forth—across all products and services.  Building your company’s brand architecture requires thought, research, and planning, but the results will serve your company’s—and your customers’—interests now and into the future.

The ins & outs of brand architecture

Building your company’s brand architecture requires thought, research, and planning, but the results will serve your company’s—and your customers’—interests now and into the future. Here are the nuts and bolts of different brand structures and the importance of choosing the right one.

       Is your brand messaging in need of an update?   Your brand messaging is directly linked to lead generation. Wondering how? Your messaging helps prospective buyers figure out if your product and company is the right choice for them. This is why most businesses spend considerable time pinpointing the exact messages they will convey.   Once the messaging is set, a business can move on to other issues, right? Wrong. There are situations—perhaps more than you’d expect—when your brand message deserves an update. Let’s dig in.   What is brand messaging?   Brand messaging refers to a set of phrases that communicate what you’re offering. In a quick scan, they articulate product/service category, points of difference and key benefits. In a nutshell, this messaging helps buyers understand why they should choose to buy from you rather than your competitors.   Taglines or slogans are one of the most obvious aspects of brand messaging. When you hear the phrase, “Just do it.”, you think of Nike. Taken a step further, you might think about dedication, ambition, and competitive spirit. These associations are intentional. Similarly, 3M’s slogan is “Science. Applied to life.” and their personality traits are  reportedly : free thinking and creative; sharing and trusting; fascinating; high-energy, optimistic and confident.     According to recent research  , messaging that’s focused on features, functions and business outcomes results in a 21% increase in perceived brand benefits, on average. Compare this to messaging focused on social and emotional benefits, which boosts results by 42%.   It may surprise you to hear that new messaging can be developed pretty quickly. At Hop Skip Marketing, we get all of the key stakeholders together in front of a whiteboard and develop it as a group in a few hours. The beauty of this type of approach is that you have buy-in, and the leaders of all the impacted functions appreciate how the messaging was developed.   Do’s and Don’ts of developing your brand messaging   DO: Convey what you offer and which category you are in.  DO: Articulate what makes it different (better) from the other options buyers will be considering.  DO: Compare your draft messaging to that of your competitive set to ensure you aren’t saying the exact same things they are. (Remember, you are trying to help buyers understand why they should choose to buy from you.)  DO: Quantify your messages to make them more believable. For example, citing “deep experience” is not as compelling as “25 years’ experience and 22,000 customers served”.  DO: Test messaging with a sample audience before launching.  DON’T: Promise things about your product that aren’t true today. Misleading promises can quickly tarnish a good reputation.  DON’T: Hang your hat on things that your buyers don’t value.  DON’T: Launch your messaging without first introducing it internally and explaining why you have settled on this particular set of messages.   Rolling out brand messaging   Brand messaging goes well beyond your website. It should be used frequently and consistently inside and outside of your organization. And it should be known by everyone at the company from your CEO to your front desk employees. Seem like overkill? Not at all. We just finished rolling out brand messaging for a client. During the workshop to develop their messaging, the management team agreed that their overall customer service and production process are par-none. We explored all the ways this is true throughout their process, including a 10-step quality program. In the end, we landed on the tagline “Exception. Every step of the way.” with sub messaging such as having a 10-step quality program for product excellence. Before taking this messaging public, we first rolled out with the sales and production teams, then to the entire company in an all-company townhall. Not only did we explain all of the messaging and how each department would ensure it is living up to these public promises, we also showed them how it would position us ahead of the competitors who had nothing like this. Just last week, the production team started moving a 10-step checklist along with each unit to ensure the team signs off on each step as it is completed.  Once internalized, it’s time to take your messaging public. Plan to update as much (if not all of) your public-facing collateral as you can at launch time. If this isn’t feasible, create a rollout plan.   Reinforcing your messaging with imagery and colour   Visual elements like images, colours and fonts are often used to reinforce brand messaging. For instance, many companies whose Canadian ownership is a key differentiator include “100% Canadian” or “Canadian owned and operated” into their messaging. This is often reinforced by Canadian imagery or symbols, and a brand colour palette that includes red. This is the approach we took with one of our clients who is in a category alongside many US-owned companies.  Messaging should be reinforced through experiential aspects too, like customer service, hiring, and corporate policies. For example, if a company hangs its hat on being the category leader for innovation, a slick up-to-date website designs with best-in-class user experience would make their messaging much more believable. Or, if a company says they treat customers like gold, all departments should have set ways that make that happen, like responding to inquiries within 15 minutes, or sending a gift if the service is in some way sub-par (ever received a free Starbucks drink because they messed up the order or took too long?).   Does your brand message need a review?   Once rolled out, a brand message can seem immovable—and indeed, a great message will resonate over time. But there are several events in the lifetime of a brand that should trigger a message review.   Introducing a new innovation   When there are new innovations in your sector you should schedule a messaging review to ensure that you remain relevant and at the forefront.   When you do a rebrand or refresh   Brand elements like design and logos should be refreshed periodically. If you are shifting to demonstrate new personality traits or to resonate with a different buyer group, your messaging may need tweaking.   During a new product launch   When introducing a new product, you will need to develop messaging for the product line and buyer. This work should include an audit of the competitors’ product messaging.   Entering a new market or when there’s a shift in the market   Reviewing your overall messaging when entering a new market is crucial. Perhaps less obviously, it’s a great time for review if there has been a change in competitor activity, an economic shift, or a change in consumer buying behaviour in your existing market. If you are in an industry that’s growing, you’ll have to revisit messaging and position frequently.   When developing your annual marketing plan   Times change, which is why each year you need to engage in strategic marketing work. Consider a messaging and brand review (your messaging and that of your top competitors) as part of that work.   Your brand messaging checklist   There are numerous opportunities throughout the year to check your messaging, but what should you be looking for? Here are the three important questions to ask:   1. Does your core messaging offer anything different from your competitors?   Be honest! If your messaging has become repetitive or indistinct, it’s time to reach for something new to differentiate yourself.   2. Do your messages reflect reality?  Your brand messaging might be excruciatingly clever, but if it doesn’t reflect reality it won’t land the way you want it to. Make sure your communications are grounded.   3. Do your messages still resonate with your target audience?   Changes in products or price point, new competitors, or shifts in customer behaviour can all affect your business landscape. Review your target audience, and make sure your messages still resonate. A customer survey is a great way to do this.  Your company works hard to create relevant, resonant brand messaging. Don’t let the effort go to waste. Keep an eye on industry trends and take advantage of the natural opportunities for review that arise throughout the year. Regular brand messaging checkups can help you grow and prosper.

Is your brand messaging in need of an update?

Your company works hard to create relevant, resonant brand messaging. Regular brand messaging checkups can help you grow and prosper. Whether it’s new innovation, shift in industry trends, or creating your annual marketing plan a review of your brand messaging should be on your checklist. Let’s dig in further….